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06-06-2016

LR: New HMD Bunkering Vessel Design "Vital Next Step" for LNG Bunkering Capability

The bunkering vessel has been designed with the capacity to supply 20,000 TEU container ships.

Lloyd’s Register (LR) says a Hyundai Mipo Dockyard (HMD) design for a 6,600 m3 liquefied natural gas (LNG) bunker vessel, which has recently been given LR's Approval in Principle (AiP), is a "vital next step" in building the capability of a global marine LNG bunkering network.

The bunkering vessel is said to have been designed with the capacity to supply 20,000 TEU container ships, and meets both small scale requirements and current maximum expected requirements for large ships trading worldwide.

"This HMD design is another significant step in the requirements for safe, efficient gas bunkering worldwide. We are at the start of the LNG bunkering era," said Leo Karistios, Gas Technology Manager at LR.

"The industry is developing technical solutions to support commercial and regulatory requirements. No one knows at what speed the commercial take-up of gas fuelled shipping will now proceed but concrete technical progress is being made."

The bunker vessel design is said to feature two cylindrical type ‘C’ tanks, a reliquefaction plant, a "new and sophisticated" loading arm, and high manoeuvrability.

Further, the design is noted to be compliant with requirements set out in the revised International Code of the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code).

"We have steadfastly invested in developing the wide variety of gas ship design not only to respond quickly to the market demand and but also to lead the market," said Chang-hyun Yoon, Executive Vice President of HMD's Initial Planning Division.

"For this reason, we have prepared three prototype of 6,600 m3 (single or twin screw) and 15,000 m3 Class Dual Fuelled LNG Bunkering vessels targeting to operate in Zeebrugge small LNG terminal for LNG fuel in order to develop a global market for the LNG bunkering business."

Both 6,600 m3 and 15,000 m3 bunkering vessels are said to be NOx Tier III compliant in gas mode, and feature a gas combustion unit, as well as the option of different combinations of thrusters, and a flap rudder for better operation in rough waters.

In December, Ship & Bunker reported that Nick Brown, Brand and External Relations Manager at LR, said opportunities in LNG bunkering are highly dependent on the financial returns for the alternative fuel.


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